Resident disgusted at bright green plant coating the River Cam – Cambridge News

A resident is disgusted over the build up of luminous green plants running over the backs of the River Cam.

Lesley Guebert, a volunteer at the Arts Theatre in Cambridge told Cambridgeshire Live : “Bright lime green algae attracts attention. I have not seen anything as bad as this.

“It looks awful. The water is thick with a green algae that is supporting litter of plastic bottles and sandwich wrappers that has been thrown into the water on either side of the lane.”

Steams alongside Garrett Hostel Lane in Cambridge have turned green
(Image: Cambridge News)

Lesley takes the public access route every Tuesday evening and spotted the algae along Garrett Hostel Lane, a public route over the backs of the river cam.

Lesley also explained that the algae and plastic pollution runs the whole stretch from Queens Road and over the bridge towards Trinity College Gardens.

She told CambridgeshireLive the green growth has sat there for three to four weeks.

“It is most unattractive, and groups of tourists walk this way, in addition to locals,” Lesley added.

Litter has been ditched in the streams alongside Garrett Hostel Lane
(Image: Cambridge News)

An Environment Agency spokesperson said: “Due to the prolonged dry weather the region has been experiencing, we are seeing an increase of surface weed on a number of rivers.

“The lack of rainfall means the water is clearer so the sun’s rays can penetrate more easily, creating perfect conditions for weed growth. It is a natural phenomenon.”

The Environment Agency also said they would clear weed if it was causing a flood risk, navigation issues or if fish were in distress.

However, the Cambridge City council disputed the fact that it was algae.

A Biodiversity Officer from Cambridge City Council, Guy Belcher told Cambridgeshire Live: “I have just been to have a look and could see no evidence of blue green algae. A duck weed species, most likely the native Lemna minor, is covering much of the ditch and does bare a resemblance.

“This is a non-toxic plant species that grows in slow moving, nutrient rich waters,” he said.

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