The director of SFWMD states that early blue-green algae may run out of fuel in the rainy season. – Floridanewstimes.com

Olga

Blue-green algae remained in parts of southwestern Florida on Monday, and the water experts we spoke to expected the green-smelling gunk to have a silver lining.

Lawrence Glenn, director of the Water Resources Division of the South Florida Water Management District, told us that it might be good to see algae grow earlier than usual. They may ingest nutrients, which means they may run out of fuel for flowering in the rainy season.

Also, on Monday, I learned that Olga community members are dealing with blue-green algae in residential canals, among other flowering outbreaks in Lie County.

Bob Johnson lives in the water for a reason.

“We enjoy boating,” Johnson said. “That’s why we’re here. We like water.”

Regarding Olga’s current situation, Johnson said, “We are away from the water.”

This is due to the odorous turquoise gunk on the canal along the shores of Olga’s waterways.

“It took about a week for these big chunks to develop and the scent to develop,” Johnson said.

This is all because there are some blue-green algae health warnings in Lie group and a desire to find out what causes the algae to become mites.

That’s where Glenn comes in.

“Every month we talk about the situation at Lake Okeechobee and along with the water quality,” Glenn said.

Glenn has the theory that early algae outbreaks can mean that it’s not a bad thing.

“Maybe this is a good thing I’ve suggested is that we’re running out of that nutrient quickly,” Glenn said.

Glenn explained that there is less fuel for summer flowering because the algae absorb nutrients before Lake Okeechobee is released during the rainy season.

“This isn’t an experiment with proven results, but in practice it generated a lot of bloom and correspondingly reduced dissolved inorganic nitrogen,” Glenn said. “At first glance, it looks like it could be very helpful.”

Johnson told us that he and his neighbors are considering putting a bubbler on the edge of the canal to prevent the algae from falling. He also said they had spoken to a local reed to clean the canal.

Meanwhile, Johnson is among those seeking answers and solutions with water managers and experts.

“I’m not frustrated yet, but I really hope I can get help,” Johnson said.

The director of SFWMD states that early blue-green algae may run out of fuel in the rainy season.

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